Connecticut Health Insurance Exchange

*Connecticut WILL have its own health insurance Exchange.
*Connecticut WILL expand Medicaid to comply with the Affordable Care Act.

A New Health Insurance Exchange For Connecticut



Starting in October 2013, citizens of Connecticut can start searching for health insurance on their own state exchange. The Affordable Care Act mandated that every person 18 and older will have to have health insurance starting in 2014 or be subject to fines from the IRS. In response to this, some states are setting up their own exchange while others are doing nothing and will use the federal marketplace.

The new Connecticut health insurance exchange is called Access Health CT and individuals, families, and small businesses can use the exchange to find insurance. The state has accepted more than 110 million dollars to develop the exchange and it hopes that eventually more than half a million people will  be insured through it.

As of July 26, 2013, state officials are planning on opening physical store fronts in several Connecticut cities. These stores will be modeled after Apple stores complete with “geniuses” who can help customers pick health insurance plans. This is a unique way of reaching residents and so far no other state is doing this.

On 8/5/2013, Aetna Insurance Co. informed the state that it will not be selling health plans on the AccessHealthCT exchange. Connecticut is now the third state Aetna has withdrawn from, the other two being Maryland and Georgia.

Links:

http://www.accesshealthct.com/

http://www.accesshealthct.com/benefits-for-you/

http://www.accesshealthct.com/how-it-works/faqs/

Connecticut Medicaid Expansion – Yes

The Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) aims to get as many people insured for health care as it can starting in 2014. One of the ways to do that is by expanding the state’s Medicaid programs.

Not all states are going along with the plan but Connecticut is. In fact Connecticut has already made the expansion in 2010 and reports are that enrollment and expenses are higher than originally anticipated. Additionally, the regulations keep coming down from Washington and those add to the overall expense of the program.